The Media Companies and Websites Doing the Most for Feminism

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If you’re anything like me, the best way to end your day is to settle down in front of a piece of media not created by a group of wealthy male predators. Unfortunately, when it comes to news and media, that might be too much to ask. Below are a few of my favorite femme-centric and women-led media sites.

Bitch MediaBitch is a nonprofit feminist media organization based in Portland, Oregon, and they cover everything from pop culture and music to design and the state of feminism. Bitch, the media organization’s magazine and website, is composed of long-form journalism written in a formal, academic tone. The writers prioritize intersectionality and progressivism, making these articles interesting, informative, and educational reads.

JezebelJezebel is a feminist website and blog covering everything for politics to makeup reviews. Their witty, educational commentary—written primarily by women—provides entertainment and information for millions of readers worldwide. Though Jezebel has been criticized for only covering topics relevant to white women and feminism, the organization has introduced initiatives to reinforce their commitment to intersectionality.

ReductressOkay, so this one isn’t really news, and it isn’t really about feminism. However, this Onion-esque website dishes out satirical takes on everyday women’s issues—from being ghosted by your Tinder date to the cognitive dissonance we experience when deciding to wear red lipstick. Some top headlines include: “Study Finds It’s Still Annoying When Brian Says the Right Things About Male Privilege,” “Feminist Hero? This Woman Rescued a Judith Butler Book from a Burning Building,” “Lifelong Friends Celebrate 85 Years of Shitting on Susan,” and “What to Do When Your 23andMe Informs You That You Are Gimli, Son of Gloin.”

5 thoughts on “The Media Companies and Websites Doing the Most for Feminism

  1. Three researchers at Blanquerna University, Spain, examined how adolescents interact with social media and specifically Facebook. They suggest that interactions on the website encourage representing oneself in the traditional gender constructs, which helps maintain gender stereotypes.

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